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Category Archive for 'Preservation'

Nebraska Mountain Lion License Plate Proposal Unanimous  

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WSU’s Large Carnivore Conservation Lab is at the cutting edge of proving how predator populations police themselves. How sport hunting quotas that exceed reproduction rates lead to increased conflicts by removing the breeding adults that keep order, research we continue to submit to state agencies stuck in 19th-century fantasies of predator management. Heres’ the Lab’s […]

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The joyous event back in January is marred by this female’s release location. The Picayune Strand is within spitting distance of the I-75 killing corridor that has claimed countless panthers. Here, too, was a wasted opportunity to put a potential breeder north of the Caloosahatchee River barrier, which a female has yet to cross. The […]

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P-22’s source colony west of Hollywood is a notoriously fragile one. Cut-off by highways and development to other cougars, fewer than a dozen cats hang on by a genetic thread in the Santa Monica Mountains. We often talk of how cougar populations require little management. In this case, they do, and the National Park Service […]

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Living Alongside Wildlife Ghost of the Appalachians  

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A New Scientist article titled, Scared to Death: How Intimidation Changes Ecosystems, and featuring CRF VP John Laundre’s groundbreaking research on predator ecology, was reprinted by Psychology Today. Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf? Fear and Loathing in YLP  

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Surrounded by several million people, the Santa Cruz Mountains along the Bay Area peninsula – an area about half the size of the 700,000 acre Catskill Park in southern New York State –¬†supports about 30 adult cougars and 40 kittens. The Santa Cruz’s largest protected area is the 18,000 acre Big Basin Redwood State Park. […]

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The Santa Ana Mountains of Southern California between LA and San Diego maintains a cougar population despite continued poaching, roadkills, fragmentation and habitat loss. One of the first urban cougar populations ever to be studied, twenty years later, Paul Beier’s Santa Ana cats are still holding their own. Orange County Register    

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