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http://coyotes-wolves-cougars.blogspot.com/

More information on the Wisconsin Deer Study that is underway: In the Eastern part of the State, excluding death by helicoper capture to tag the animals(which will cease going forward), 7 deer were killed by cars and 1 from starvation—no wolf,coyote, bear or bobcat caused predation!,,,,,,,,,,,,,In the Northern region of the study, excluding mortality caused by helicopter capture, 5 deer starved to death, 4 were taken by wolves, four lost their life to bobcats and 1 loss to coyotes and 3 from undetermined predation………….3 were killed by cars, 3 were illegally poached by people and two more were lost through unknown causes……………….So despite the author highlighting the carnivore predation(which writers always seem to play up),,,,,,,,,,a significant number of deer deaths were attributed to humans……………and the hunting season has not started yet so even more archery, muzzle loader and rifle human predation to come over the next 3 or 4 months………….Bottom line is that the woods still have too many deer in them to reproduce properly and be as diverse as they should be…………….Cougars need to be added to the mix of limiting agents for deer and the wolves should continue to spread to the Southern tier of the State to up the deer control even further……………most of wisconsin has a range of 14 to 75 deer per square mile…………..with Southeastern and Southwestern Counties harboring as many as 125 deer per square mile………………..THIS IS INSANITY AND WE ARE LETTING DEER(BECAUSE OF HUNTER POLITICAL PRESSURE) EAT OUR FORESTS TO THE QUICK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outdoors/129596158.html

jsonline – Journal Sentinel – Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Two study areas in state produce varying deer data

 

Paul Smith

Navarino – The largest deer research effort in Wisconsin history is halfway through its first year.

Among the preliminary findings: Predators have taken more deer in the northern study area; fawn survival has been higher in the eastern study area; several yearling bucks have dispersed over 15 miles, but mature deer have tended to stay in a smaller home range; and capture-related mortality of deer was unacceptably high and will result in changes to trapping procedures.

 

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